America on the Brink of Change, 1890-1920 WebQuest
An Internet WebQuest on America on the Brink of Change

created by Krystal Testa

Introduction | The Task | The Process & Resources | Conclusion | HyperText Dictionary



Introduction

'Whether they will or not, Americans must now begin to look outward. The growing production of the country demands it.'

-Alfred T. Mahan, 1980



The United States changed during the 19th century where it entered as an anti-imperialist agricultural nation, but one hundred years later the United States would become a world wide industrial power. That is why the industrial boom at the turn of the century had various changing effects on the United States. While the boom was occurring, the United States was in search of new markets for products and new territories, which lead to international conflicts and war. In addition to the problems created by the boom a reform movement known as progressivism emerged. The ambitions of the imperialists and the progressives helped to contribute to the nation's growth as a world power, but this role drew the United States into World War I.

In the following WebQuest, you will use the resources on the Internet as well as your textbook and classroom resources to learn all about Brink of Change in America to gain a better understanding of the topic and how the period 1890-1920 shaped American's lives today.



'American Pathways to the Present: America in the Twentieth Century.' (1995). New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, p304.




The Quest

How did the effects on technology, the economic advancements, the role of the United States in the world, various conflicts in society, and the rise of big business help shape the United States today?




The Process and Resources

In this WebQuest you will be working to answer the Quest. You will explore WebPages from people all over the world that cares about American on the American on the Brink of Change. Because these are real WebPages we're tapping into, not things made just for schools, the reading level might challenge you. Feel free to use the online Webster dictionary, your textbook, and any classroom resources.

Phase 1 - Background: Something for Everyone

Use the Internet information, your textbook, and classroom resources to answer the following questions. Be creative in exploring the information so that you answer these questions as fully and insightfully as you can.

Phase 2 - Looking Deeper from Different Perspectives

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Read all the questions carefully in each section, including: Becoming a World Power, The Progressive Era, and the World War I Era.

2. Read through the Internet links to your task. If you print out the files, underline the passages that you feel are the most important. If you look at the files on the computer, copy sections you feel are important by dragging the mouse across the passage and copying / pasting it into a word processor or other writing software. Note: Remember to write down or copy/paste the URL of the file you take the passage from so you can quickly go back to it if you need to to prove your point.

3. You will also need to use your textbook and classroom resources to answer the following questions.

4. Be prepared to focus what you've learned into one main opinion that answers the Big Task based on what you have learned.

Becoming a World Power

Use the Internet information linked below as well as your textbook and class discussion to answer the following questions specifically related to America Becoming a World Power:

1. How did geographical issues affect the effort to build the canal?

2. What were the problems of building the canal?

3. How was building the canal like building the transcontinental railroad?

4. What is the Open Door Policy?

5. How many foreigners and Christian Chinese were killed?

6. Did the Boxers succeed? Explain.

7. What role did Cuba have in the war?

8. What was the dilemma in the Philippines?

9. Define the term guerrillas.

The Progressive Era

Use the Internet information linked below as well as your textbook and class discussion to answer the following questions specifically related to The Progressive Era:

1. Define the term suffrage?

2. Who resisted the suffrage movement?

3. At what level of government did most victories of suffrage take place?

4. Who were the owners of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company?

5. Why did the owners of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company ignore safety regulations?

6. How many lives were lost in the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire?

7. Who were progressives?

8. Who were muckrakers?

9. What were some reforms past at the local, state, and national level?

10. What power does the 16th Amendment give to Congress?

11. Why is it important that the 17th Amendment provides direct election of senators?

12. How has the 19th Amendment helped to shape politics today?


World War I Era

Use the Internet information linked below as well as your textbook and class discussion to answer the following questions specifically related to the World War I Era:

1. What is Zimmerman's first name?

2. Who was Zimmerman in the political field?

3. What is a filibuster?

4. Who will the United States make an alliance with?

5. Was this note propaganda for Great Britain? Explain.

6. In your opinion, why is this note important?

7. Who signed the Treaty of Versailles?

8. What was the American reaction to the Treaty of Versailles?

9. What was Germany's reaction to the Treaty of Versailles?

Pennsylvania Academic Standards

Career Education and Work 13.1.8 D:
Analyze employment factors, such as unemployment, benefits, labor, and supply and demand.

Civics and Government 5.1.12 K:
Analyze the roles of symbols on society.

Economics 6.2.9 C:
Explain the structure and purpose of the Federal Reserve Act.

Health, Safety, and Physical Education 10.3.9 A:
Analyze the role of individual responsibility for a safe environment.

History 8.1.9 C:
Analyze the fundamentals of historical interpretation of reasons and causes for multiple points of view.

History 8.1.12 D:
Synthesize historical research with primary and secondary documents.

History 8.3.12 A:
Identify and evaluate political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups in U.S. history.

History 8.3.12 D:
Identify and evaluate conflict and cooperation in U.S. history, such as World War I.


Phase 3 - Debating, Discussing, and Reaching Consensus

You have all learned about aspects of the period 1890-1920. You must now answer the Quest by using WebQuest information, your textbook, and the classroom materials into a well-developed and well-organized essay. The essay must be typed, doubled spaced, and at least 250 words.

Phase 4 - Real World Feedback

As you have learned about Muckrakers during the Progressive Era, you will now become a modern muckraker. Your job is to uncover a modern abuse in society today, such as child labor in third world countries. Your task is to:

1. Research the abuse finding current articles from the New York Times and other resources.

2. State how you would solve the abuse.

3. Compile the research into a Power Point Presentation.
-at least 10 slides
-provide background information to show that you understand the abuse
-provide supporting details of how you would solve the abuse
-site your information and resources

4. Present Power Point Presentation orally.

Your Contact is: The New York Times




Conclusion

It is not easy to know everything about the period 1890-1920, but with the use of this WebQuest, your textbook, and other classroom resources it is easy to gain a better understanding a topic as broad or complex as American on the Brink of Change. Now, you know more parts of the picture that the United States changed during the 19th century. The United States entered as an anti-imperialist agricultural nation, but one hundred years later, the United States became an industrial power that also dealt with internal conflicts. But now you all know a lot more. Nice work. You should be proud of yourselves! How can you use what you've learned to see beyond the black and white of a topic and into the grayer areas? What other parts of American on the Brink of Change could still be explored?

Remember, learning never stops.



 created by Filamentality Content by Krystal Testa, testakl@wilkes.edu
http://www.kn.sbc.com/wired/fil/pages/webbrinkofkr.html
Last revised Sun Nov 9 15:33:39 US/Pacific 2003