Child Labor 4th & 5th Grade WebQuest
An Internet WebQuest on Child Labor

created by Ms. Moses & Ms. Pinkston

Introduction | The Task | The Process & Resources | Conclusion | HyperText Dictionary



Introduction

As children living in the United States, most of you take it for granted that you will get up every morning and go to school. Children have not always had this opportunity. If you had been living in Pennsylvania a hundred years ago, you may have been expected to work in or around the coal mines instead of going to school. Children as young as five years old rose before dawn to begin their twelve hour work day. This is a historical example of child labor in our country and you may think that things like that don't still happen today, but they do! Girls and boys younger than you in many countries around the world go to work in fields and factories instead of in a classroom everyday. Think this doesn't sound too bad? Imagine working all day in 140 degree heat, inhaling dangerous chemicals, or working with tools that could cause life-threatening injuries! Throughout this unit you will learn about the horrors and hardships of child laborers past and present, near and far. You will also learn about what you can do to make a difference. You may begin to see your own lives in a new light as you become more familiar with the lives of other children your age.




The Quest




The Process and Resources

You will be assigned a partner with whom you will complete the following tasks. Please remember that while you will be working in teams, each individual student will be expected to contribute his or her fair share of work and will be accountable for material learned. You will write and keep your assignments for this unit in a binder which you will turn in at the end of the unit.

(A whole class lesson will precede this task during which the teacher will present the class with a photograph displayed on the overhead projector. Students will be asked to look at the photograph and, after the projector is turned off, to record what they saw. The teacher will then cover three-quarters of the photographs so that only one quarter is visible. Students will be asked to orally describe what they see in this section of the photograph. After each section of the photograph has been viewed, the teacher will again display the entire photograph and ask students how their observations have changed. )

Objectives

At the culmination of this unit students will be able to:

1. Interpret photographs to determine their subjects, settings and time periods.

2. Articulate their thoughts and opinions in written form.

3. Think critically about their rights and responsibilities as a child.

4. Ask thoughtful questions to clarify and extend their understandings.

5. Make connections between their lives and those of other children.

6. Compare and contrast their lives to those of other children.

7. Use a Venn diagram to effectively organize information.

8. Interpret and analyze a political cartoon.

9. Think critically about issues that affect child workers today.

10. Synthesize learned information.

11. Work cooperatively with a peer.

12. Use Internet and text resources to research a specific topic.

13. Create a presentation demonstrating new knowledge.



Phase 1 - Background: Something for Everyone

Use the Internet information linked below to answer the basic questions of who? what? where? when? why? and how? Be creative in exploring the information so that you answer these questions as fully and insightfully as you can.

Phase 2 - Looking Deeper from Different Perspectives

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Individuals or pairs from your larger WebQuest team will explore one of the roles below.

2. Read through the files linked to your group. If you print out the files, underline the passages that you feel are the most important. If you look at the files on the computer, copy sections you feel are important by dragging the mouse across the passage and copying / pasting it into a word processor or other writing software.

3. Note: Remember to write down or copy/paste the URL of the file you take the passage from so you can quickly go back to it if you need to to prove your point.

4. Be prepared to focus what you've learned into one main opinion that answers the Big Quest(ion) or Task based on what you have learned from the links for your role.

Task 1 'Photo Interpretation'

Your task will be to look at the photograph provided by the teacher and make some inferences about what is happening in the picture. Follow these guidelines in completing your task.

1. Look at and discuss your photograph with your partner.

2. Write a paragraph describing what you think is happening in the photograph.

3. Use Post-it notes to cover three-quarters of your picture. Look closely at the visible section of your photograph. What details do you notice? Discuss with your partner.

4. Repeat the above procedure for the three remaining sections of your picture.

5. Remove Post-its and look at the entire photograph again. What do you see now? Add to or change your existing paragraph to account for the details you noticed in the above activity.

6. Visit www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/childlabor/ and locate your photograph. Were your assumptions correct? Discuss the differences and similarities (if there are any) between your interpretation and what you read on this web site.

Extension Activity

Create a diary entry for one of the children in your photograph. Provide a detailed description of the child's workday. Discuss reasons this child has for working and how he/she feels about his/her job.

Task Two 'Children's Rights and Responsibilities'

(Prior to this task the whole class will brainstorm a list of rights and responsibilities they believe children have. This list will remain posted in the classroom for the duration of this uint.)

1. From our class list of children's rights and responsibilities, choose the five rights and the five responsibilities you and your partner feel are the most important.

2. Record your ideas on the 'Children's Bill of Rights' form provided by your teacher.

3. Go to www.fieldsofhope.org and click on 'Test your knowledge with our QUIZ.' Then click on 'Printable version of this quiz' and print.

4. Take the quiz with your partner and hand in to your teacher.

5. Click on 'What is Child Labor, ' then click on, 'Video clip' to watch an 8-minute video about child labor.

6. Make a list of at least five questions you now have about child labor. You will attempt to answer these questions throughout the remainder of the unit.

Extension Activity

1. Read chapter seven in Listen to Us: The World's Working Children.

2. Choose one of the three rights the authors of this book feel children are entitled to ('The Right to a Childhood,' 'The Right to be Protected from Dangerous Work,' or 'The Right to an Education'). In three paragraphs or less, discuss what this right means to you. Be sure to give specific examples.

  • Fields of Hope - Click on 'Test your knowledge with our QUIZ.' Then click on 'Printable version of this quiz' and print. Take the quiz with your partner and hand in to your teacher. Click on 'What is Child Labor, ' then click on, 'Video clip' to watch an 8-minute video about child labor.

Task Three 'A Day in the Life' Task Four 'Political Cartoons'

Task Three 'A Day in the Life'

1. Go to www.us.ilo.org/teachin/ilokids/ and click on 'A day in the life of a child laborer.'

2. Fill in your daily schedule, then click on 'Compare my day with a child laborer's.'

3. Print.

4. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast your life with that of a child laborer.

Extension Activity

1. Go to www.history.ohio-state.edu/projects/childlabor/cottondress/ and read 'The Story of My Cotton Dress.'

2. Create a daily schedule for a textile worker. Be sure to specify times (i.e. '4:30 - Wake up and wash').

Task Four 'Political Cartoons'

1. Go to http://www.snolabor.org/cartoon/htm.

2. Look at and discuss with your partner the two political cartoons featured on this page.

3. Choose one to interpret and write a caption for. Be sure you have a good understanding of what the cartoonist was trying to say about child labor.

Extension Activity

1. Create your own political cartoon. Think about the message you want to send about child labor.

2. Write a caption for your cartoon.



Task Five 'A Day in the Life'

1. Go to http://www.snolabor.org/cartoon/htm.

2. Look at and discuss with your partner the two political cartoons featured on this page.

3. Choose one to interpret and write a caption for. Be sure you have a good understanding of what the cartoonist was trying to say about child labor.

Extension Activity

1. Create your own political cartoon. Think about the message you want to send about child labor.

2. Write a caption for your cartoon.

Phase 3 - Debating, Discussing, and Reaching Consensus

FINAL PROJECT

You have learned what child labor is and how it has affected children in the past and present. You and your partner are now ready to begin your final project. Each set of partners will be assigned an area of the world in which child labor is used. Your job will be to research this area of the world and how child labor is used there. Find specific examples of child laborers, their jobs and the effects their work has on their lives. You will need to answer the following questions in your final project:

Where is child labor occurring?

Who is affected?

What type of child labor is used?

Why is child labor used?

How does this issue affect you personally?

Your job will be to teach your classmates about child labor in the area of the world you have been assigned. The following is a list of ideas to structure your presentation:

1. Write and perform a news broadcast in which you discuss the current issue of child labor.

2. Write and perform a play featuring the following characters; a child laborer, his/her parent and his/her employer.

3. Write a letter to the leader of a country in the area of the world you are studying. Explain to him or her why you think laws against child labor in his or her country should be more strictly enforced.

4. Create a Power Point presentation using text, pictures, and possibly sound to answer the above questions.

5. If you have another way to present your research consult with your teacher before beginning your project.

The following web sites may be useful to you in completing your final project:

www.snolabor.org/child.htm

www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/IRchild.main.htm

www.history.ohio-state.edu/projects/childlabor/mrcoalsstory/

www.antislavery.org/homepage/antislavery/childlabour.htm

www.boisestate.edu/socwork/dhuff/history/extras/kelly.htm

http://teacher.scholastic.com/scholasticnews/indepth/un/labor.htm

www.history.ohio-state.edu/projects/childlabor/cottondress/

www.anti-slaverysociety.addr.com/childlabor07.htm

www.cwa.tnet.co.th/domestic/

www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/childlabor/

www.unicef.org/protection/index_childlabour.html

www.freethechildren.org

www.us.ilo.org/teachin/ilokids/

http://www.fieldsofhope.org/

http://www.boondocksnet.com/labor/

Phase 4 - Real World Feedback

Evaluation
Your performance on your task activities and final project will be evaluated using the following rubric:


Beginning=1
Developing=2
Accomplished=3
Exemplary=4
Score



Performance Tasks

Three of five tasks have been completed.

Assignments are brief and lacking detail, or incorrect information has been given.

Four to five tasks have been completed. Assignments are brief and lacking detail, or incorrect information has been given.

All five tasks have been completed. Adequate and accurate information has been provided. All five tasks have been completed. Accurate and specific information has been included to support ideas.



Extensions


One extension activity has been completed. Work is creative, accurate and specific.

Two extension activities have been completed. Work is creative, accurate and specific.

Three extension activities have been completed. Work is creative, accurate and specific.

Four to five extension activities have been completed. Work is creative, accurate and specific.


Final Project


All five questions have not been answered accurately. Presentation is lacking in details and creativity.

All five questions have been answered. Specific details and creativity are lacking.

All five questions have been answered. Presentation provides specific and accurate information. Creativity is lacking.

All five questions have been answered. Presentation provides specific and accurate information in a creative and engaging way.



Participation

Rarely contributes in a meaningful way to discussions and group work.

Is often off-task and disrespectful to others. Occasionally contributes in a meaningful way to discussions and group work.

Occasionally shows respect for others' opinions and ideas. Often contributes in a meaningful way to discussions and group work.

Respects others' opinions and ideas. Contributes in a meaningful way on a regular basis to discussions and group work. Respects others' opinions and ideas.


Written Work


Work contains many errors in spelling and grammar.

Is still at draft stage. Work contains some errors in grammar and spelling.

Work contains few errors in spelling and grammar. Work has been carefully edited and is error free.

Your Contact is: the designated contact




Conclusion

You have learned how child labor has affected and still affects children all over the world. Instead of going to school, many children must work in fields, in factories, or on fishing boats for 12 or more hours every day. These children would love the opportunity to read, write and learn. So remember them the next time you moan and groan about getting out of bed in the morning, completing that spelling assignment, or washing the dishes. explored? Remember, learning never stops.



 created by Filamentality Content by Ms. Moses & Ms. Pinkston, kmose@poynette.k12.wi.us
http://www.kn.sbc.com/wired/fil/pages/webchildlams.html
Last revised Thu Mar 18 11:23:39 US/Pacific 2004